Become A Noun For Posterity’s sake

Adam Cole and Robert Krulwich

Adam: When I say "Henry Shrapnel, Jules Leotard, Robert Bunsen," you think — what?
Me: That they’re inventors?
Adam: No. Better than that. Each one has become immortal. They’re nouns!
Me: Is that a good thing, becoming a noun? …
Adam: Are you kidding? It’s a wonderful thing. A thing to sing about.
Me: You’re going to sing?
Adam: If I may …

Me: You see, becoming a noun is not always a plus.
Adam: You’re beginning to convince me.

Samuel Maverick
Me:
Then let me keep going, cause I’ve got another example: Samuel Maverick, a Texas rancher, signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence in 1836.
Adam: OK, what about him?
Me: Here’s a guy who refused to brand his cattle, because he said he didn’t want to cause them any pain. (Or maybe he was too busy buying and selling real estate.) But all his neighbors figure, well, he’s just some stubborn, independent-minded loon who doesn’t care what anybody thinks …
Adam: A "maverick?"
Me: Yeah, when all he really was, was a guy who was nice to cows. The noun doesn’t tell you that.

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