Secularism Makes People More Ethical?

Going Godless

Hilmar Schmundt

Boston University Psychologist Catherine Caldwell-Harris has studied the difference between religious and secular minds. 

JASON GROW/DER SPIEGEL

Boston University Psychologist Catherine Caldwell-Harris has studied the difference between religious and secular minds.

Non-believers are often more educated, more tolerant and know more about God than the pious. A new wave of research is trying to figure out what goes on in the minds of an ever-growing group of people known as the "Nones".

Barry Kosmin is a different kind of market researcher. His data focuses on consumers targeted by companies like Lifechurch.tv or World Overcomers Christian Church TM. The sociologist analyzes church-affiliated commercial entities, from souvenir shops to television channels and worship services.

But the most significant target of Kosmin’s research is the consumer group most likely to shy away from such commercial products: secularists. "The non-religious, or Nones, hold the fastest-growing world view in the market," says Kosmin. "In the past 20 years, their numbers in the United States have doubled to 15 percent."

Read More>>

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: