Can food be art?

Helen Lewis-Hasteley

Nathan Myhrvold was Stephen Hawking’s researcher and Bill Gates’s right-hand man at Microsoft. Now, he’s written a £395 cookbook

A cutaway image of a pot roast from Nathan Myhrvold’s Modernist Cuisine. Photo: The Cooking Lab, LLC

How’s this for a CV? Nathan Myhrvold graduated from high school at 14, finished a physics PhD at 23, got a job as a postdoctoral researcher for Stephen Hawking, broke off to found an internet start-up that was bought out by Micro­soft and rose up the ranks to become its chief technology officer, before retiring from that role at the grand old age of 40. Oh, and he is an award-winning nature photographer and won the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest in 1991.

There has been one constant in the broad sweep of Myhrvold’s life: food. He is obsessed with it. Now, at last, he has the time and money to indulge that obsession. So what does a retired multimillionaire foodie do? Write the world’s biggest, most expensive cookbook, of course.

You might not think that there’s much of a market for the six-volume, 2,438-page Modernist Cuisine, which costs £395, but you’d be wrong. The first print run sold out and a second is under way. The book is also being translated into French, German and Spanish.

The world’s top chefs are in ecstasy. "This book will change the way we understand the kitchen," Ferran Adrià of El Bulli swoons. "If Leonardo da Vinci were alive today, he would write a book called The Codex of Cooking. This cookbook exists at last," Edouard Cointreau, president of the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards, gushes. Both Adrià and the Fat Duck’s Heston Blumenthal have written a foreword.

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